Posted on

Best cbd oil for making edibles

How to Make Cannabis Oil at Home

Making your own cannabis oil at home is easy if you know a few tricks. Learn how to make canna oil in your kitchen with our complete recipe and step-by-step guide.

DIY Cannabis Oil: The Basics

Homemade cannabis oil offers a variety of health and wellness benefits. You may choose to mix the canna oil into another edible or beverage recipe, apply the canna oil topically, or place a few drops under your tongue like a cannabis tincture .

Canna oil has recreational uses as well as medicinal purposes. Here are a few therapeutic uses for cannabis oil:

These possible health benefits also depend on whether you use hemp or marijuana in your oil.

Hemp vs. Marijuana: Which Should You Use?

Hemp or CBD oil is a good choice if you live in a state where cannabis is illegal. CBD hemp oil may also be the right option if you want to avoid “getting high” from tetrahydrocannabinol (THC). Using marijuana with a full spectrum of cannabinoids may offer more potent therapeutic benefits through the entourage effect .

Dosing

Dosing is one of the most challenging issues with cannabis edibles , including canna oil. Too much THC can give you an unpleasant and lingering high. For this reason, it’s a good idea to consult with a physician who can provide you with proper dosing instructions for your body chemistry and level of cannabis experience.

Best Carrier Oil for Cannabis Oil

Many cannabis users report that coconut oil makes the best carrier oil for cannabis oil. Coconut oil contains beneficial fatty acids that go well in both edibles and topicals. However, alternatives to coconut oil also work well, such as vegetable oil or lecithin.

Using Lecithin

Lecithin is a type of fat that allows for ingredients to stick and bind together. Adding lecithin to your recipes and/or into your oil can help the canna oil bind together with other ingredients more readily and improve shelf life. Lecithin has the added benefit of increasing the bioavailability of cannabinoids. Sunflower lecithin is best for a range of diets. Eggs are also a source of lecithin and act as a binding ingredient in baking.

Why It’s Important to Decarboxylate Cannabis

Decarboxylating or “decarbing” cannabis refers to a chemical reaction where a carbon atom is removed from a carbon chain, resulting in the release of carbon dioxide (CO2). Key cannabinoids, like THC and CBD, convert from different original forms during the decarbing process.

For example, THCA (tetrahydrocannabinolic acid) is non-psychoactive in its raw form but becomes psychoactive as THC after decarboxylation. Likewise, CBDA (cannabidiolic acid) is the acid precursor to CBD and may provide its own health benefits .

To change THCA to THC and CBDA to CBD, the raw cannabis flower must be decarboxylated first. Decarboxylating also makes certain cannabinoids, such as CBD, more bioavailable (i.e., your body can process them more easily).

Cannabis Oil Recipe

The following recipe includes everything you need to make cannabis oil at home.

What You’ll Need

  • Rimmed baking tray
  • Baking paper
  • Crockpot, double boiler, or saucepan
  • Cheesecloth or strainer
  • Cooking twine to tie the cheesecloth

Ingredients

  • 3.5 grams of flower
  • 1/2 cup of cooking oil (coconut oil or olive oil)

Steps

Step 1

Break up any cannabis flower or “buds” you have into smaller pieces.

Step 2

Layer the pieces onto a rimmed baking tray lined with baking paper/parchment. Place the baking tray into the center of a preheated oven set to 240°F-248°F (115°C-120°C) for 30-40 minutes. Stir every 10 minutes.

Step 3

Allow the cannabis to cool to room temperature. It should appear darker in color – usually, light brown or yellow, and not as green as fresh cannabis.

Step 4

Once cooled, coarsely grind the cannabis and store it in an airtight container.

Step 5

Combine the cannabis and coconut oil using one of the following methods:

  • In a slow cooker or crockpot on low for about 4-6 hours, stirring occasionally.
  • In a double boiler on low for 6-8 hours, stirring occasionally – a simple heat-proof bowl over a saucepan of boiling water will suffice.
  • On the stove in a saucepan on low heat for 3 hours, stirring regularly. This method is the fastest but most susceptible to scorching. You can add a small amount of water to the oil to prevent scorching.

Note that the temperature of the oil should never exceed 245°F (118°C).

Step 6

Strain your canna-oil through a cheesecloth or strainer to get rid of the plant material.

Get Your Delicious Canna Oil Recipe

Alternative Method for Making Canna-Oil

You can also infuse raw cannabis directly in olive or coconut oil by first getting the cannabis-oil mixture to a temperature of between 212°F (100°C) and 230°F (110°C) to decarboxylate it. Then, simmer and double boil it for around 1- 2 hours at a temperature of between 158°F (70°C) and 199°F (93°C).

Double boiling ensures that the oil does not go above 212°F (100°C) after the initial decarboxylation, and means you can decarb the cannabis at a lower temperature over a few hours. However, we recommend decarboxylating the cannabis first rather than decarbing in the oil, which is more efficient.

If you’re double boiling decarbed cannabis, a temperature between 100°F and 120°F (38°C – 49°C) in a double boiler for between 1 and 5 hours is ideal. Use a cheesecloth to hold the raw or decarbed cannabis as you double boil it to avoid straining the oil afterward. Although raw cannabis can be added directly to oil, it is still best to decarb the cannabis first to maximize the shelf life of your oil. You can also use the leftover plant matter to make edibles.

Tips and Tricks for Making Homemade Canna-Oil

Follow these tips and tricks to make the best homemade canna-oil.

Always Cook at Low Temperatures

To retain any acidic cannabinoids, cook at lower temperatures or use the infused oil without cooking it. Once the oil has been infused, you can heat it to a maximum of 350°F (approx 176°C) to keep all the cannabinoids from burning off. We recommend cooking at below 284°F (140°C) or even 248 (120°C).

Extend Shelf-Life with Proper Storage

Cannabinoids do not last forever, and over time and exposure to light, air, and heat, your cannabis-infused oil will decrease potency. Acidic cannabinoids, in particular, are very unstable and do not last very long when exposed to the air.

Any impurities in the cannabis-infused oil will also affect how long a cannabis-infused oil will last. Therefore, properly straining any plant material from the oil is essential to prevent mold and bacteria growth.

Kept in a cool, dark place, cannabis-infused oil should retain its potency for about 1-1.5 years. Room temperature is appropriate if your indoor environment stays below 70 degrees Fahrenheit.

Infuse Oil to Retain Terpenes

Much of the flavor and effect of cannabis come from its terpenes and flavonoids . Infusing decarboxylated cannabis into oil will impart the flavor of the cannabis into the oil. While the terpenes and flavonoids may be pleasant when smelled (and even smoked or vaporized), the taste of cannabis when eaten is not usually as pleasant. Many people try to overcome the taste with sugar, hence the huge variety of medicated sweet treats like pot brownies .

Strain to Help Get Rid of Unpleasant Tastes

Straining away the plant material from the oil will reduce the unpleasant taste but not eliminate it. Matching the flavor profile of the cannabis-infused oil to the dish is possible but not easy considering the number of terpenes and terpenoids at play. Other ingredients can mask the flavor, as can infusing the oil with other herbs and spices.

Reach out to one of the qualified physicians at Leafwell to learn more about the health benefits of canna oil and other cannabis products. Our doctors are here to help you quickly apply for a medical marijuana card.

How Can I Legally Buy Cannabis to Make Canna Oil?

Stay informed about the current cannabis laws in your state to know if you can legally buy cannabis to make canna oil.

Is Canna Oil the Same as CBD Oil?

No. The difference between canna oil and CBD oil comes down to THC. Canna oil contains a significant amount of THC, while CBD oil contains only trace amounts of THC, i.e., not enough to have psychoactive effects.

How Long Does It Take to Make Cannabis Oil?

If using a double-boiler, the infusion process to make canna oil takes approximately 6 to 8 hours until you have a final product.

Carrier Oils for CBD: How to Choose the Best One

Adrienne Dellwo is an experienced journalist who was diagnosed with fibromyalgia and has written extensively on the topic.

Verywell Health articles are reviewed by board-certified physicians and healthcare professionals. These medical reviewers confirm the content is thorough and accurate, reflecting the latest evidence-based research. Content is reviewed before publication and upon substantial updates. Learn more.

Lana Butner, ND, LAc, is a board-certified naturopathic doctor and licensed acupuncturist in New York City.

If you’ve ever used a CBD oil, you’ve gotten more from the product than just cannabidiol (CBD). For multiple reasons, manufacturers include a carrier oil, too.

As its name suggests, a carrier oil delivers (or carries) the contents of the active compound. In this case, it’s CBD. In the realm of beauty products, carrier oils dilute essential oils because the essential oil may be too strong on its own. (For example, a lavender reaction from lavender oil can cause the skin to itch, burn, or break out in blisters.)

Carrier oils are important to CBD because they help dissolve the cannabinoid’s molecules so they can be absorbed by the body. Many carrier oils are similar, but they may have differences that could be important to you for various reasons. For example, most of them are nut-based or plant-based, and you could be allergic to them. Oils that are taken orally may not taste good to you. Reading the label is a smart move—as long as you know what you’re looking for.

See also  Medical cbd oil for cats

This article explains the purpose of carrier oils and the possible side effects. It also describes the six carrier oils you’re likely to see in stores and online, including their advantages and drawbacks.

Marketing Outpaces Science

CBD is an abbreviation for cannabidiol. It’s one of 100-plus chemicals in the cannabis plant that may have health benefits. It’s widely assumed that CBD oil can relieve arthritis pain, chronic pain, and chronic nerve pain as well as reduce inflammation, ease anxiety, and improve sleep. Researchers are actively studying other uses for CBD oil, particularly in terms of slowing cancer cell growth.

Purpose of CBD Carrier Oils

CBD products use different carrier oils, sometimes alone and sometimes in combinations. They serve several important functions:

Better Absorption

One key reason for using a carrier oil is that it improves bioavailability, which means it helps your body absorb CBD oil. CBD is fat-soluble, which means that it dissolves in oil rather than water. Fat-soluble substances are better absorbed when digested along with fat, even in small amounts.

When you digest water-soluble substances, like sugar or many vitamins and minerals, your digestive tract sends them directly into your bloodstream (because blood is a water-based liquid).

Fat-soluble substances can’t be absorbed this way. Instead, your digestive tract sends them into fatty tissues and they’re distributed through your body by the lymphatic system, which is part of your immune system. Any excess is stored in your liver and fatty tissues for later use.

All carrier oils are fat-soluble, which means CBD dissolves in it. Then the oil carries the CBD into the proper tissues so they’re more accessible by your body.

Know Your Tinctures

CBD products have introduced consumers to a new lexicon. For example, concentrated CBD oil usually taken through a dropper is known as a tincture.

Easier Dosing

CBD is a potent chemical, which means you don’t need much of it for a medicinal effect. However, this poses a problem when it comes to dosing. To deliver accurate and consistent doses, it’s easier to measure out a dropperful of CBD-infused oil than a tiny amount of crystalline isolate (which is CBD in pure form).

Added Health Benefits

Carrier oils sometimes include health benefits all on their own. For example, olive oil has gotten a lot of attention for its heart-healthy benefits.

If there’s an oil you’d like to get more of in your diet, adding it to your CBD regimen is one way to get it. (This said, it remains debatable whether one or two droppers of carrier oil a day is enough to have any tangible effect on your health. This is another CBD-related topic that falls under the category of “more research is required.”)

CBD Products Come From Hemp

CBD products almost always are derived from hemp, which is botanically and legally different from the marijuana plant. By law, CBD products can’t contain more than 0.3% THC (short for delta-9- tetrahydrocannabinol ), which is the chemical in marijuana that creates a high.

Side Effects and Precautions

Most people don’t have side effects from common carrier oils. Some oils, though, may not be right for people with certain illnesses or who take certain medications. Always check with your healthcare provider before adding anything to your dietary regimen—even a “natural” product like CBD in a carrier oil. Natural doesn’t always mean safe.

If you have tree-nut allergies or other food allergies, be especially diligent about selecting CBD products with carrier oils you know are safe for you. All ingredients should be specified on the label.

For topical preparations, know that some carrier oils or other added ingredients may cause an itchy, red rash called allergic contact dermatitis. Others may cause a skin reaction after sun exposure. Be sure you’re familiar with the potential side effects of whatever products you’re using. And play it safe by testing a miniscule amount of topical oil on an obscure patch of skin to see if you develop a reaction.

What About Essential Oils?

Carrier oils aren’t the same thing as essential oils used for aromatherapy. Essential oils are highly concentrated, which is why they have a strong fragrance. Many essential oils can cause poisoning when ingested or absorbed through the skin, even in small amounts. This is true even if the oil comes from something that is normally safe to ingest, such as nutmeg.

Essential oils are often used topically (on the skin) after being diluted by a carrier oil. Essential oils themselves, however, should never be used as a carrier oil. Some topical CBD formulations may include essential oils such as lavender or eucalyptus oils because of their purported health benefits.

Before using these products, be sure you’re familiar with the ingredients and that you’re not allergic to any of them. Watch also for side effects, which can occur soon after using them.

Common Carrier Oils

Some CBD oils may contain one or more carrier oils. Some common carrier oils are:

  • Medium-chain triglyceride (MCT) oil
  • Hemp seed oil
  • Olive oil
  • Avocado oil

MCT Oil

MCT oil is the most common carrier oil for CBD products. It can be derived from coconut or palm kernel oil, but coconut is the most common source. On labels, it’s sometimes listed as fractionated coconut oil, which means it contains more liquid than solid compared to normal coconut oil, thanks to fatty acids.

Medium-chain triglycerides are a type of fatty acid that your body can quickly absorb because it doesn’t have to break it down via digestion before sending it off to the lymph system. It also absorbs easily through the skin.

Long-chain triglycerides require more digestion time. Short-chain triglycerides are often consumed by gut bacteria before they’ve had time to be absorbed. So MCTs are the most useful.

Pros:

  • Quick absorption due to molecular structure
  • 90% saturated fat, which also aids absorption
  • Light, thin oil
  • Almost flavorless
  • Doesn’t require chemical processing
  • Less expensive than some carrier oils
  • Slow to break down and go rancid

Cons:

  • Temporary digestive side effects (nausea, gas, diarrhea, vomiting) in some people
  • Possible excessive build-up of ketones in the body (dangerous with poorly controlled diabetes)
  • Not recommended for people with liver disease
  • May interact with cholesterol-lowering statin drugs

Additional Health Claims

Some scientific evidence suggests that MCT oil may:

  • Help with weight loss by reducing your appetite, increasing metabolism, and making your body burn calories faster
  • Have benefits for people with autism, epilepsy, cancer, type 2 diabetes, and Alzheimer’s disease
  • Activate the immune system to fight yeast and bacterial overgrowth

While promising, much of this research is preliminary. More research is needed before MCT oil can be recommended for these uses.

Scrutinize Coconut Oil Labels

If the label of a CBD product says “coconut oil,” it’s likely regular coconut oil and not MCT. While perfectly fine as a carrier oil, regular coconut oil may not have all of the same benefits of an MCT.

Hemp Seed Oil

It may come from the same plant, but hemp seed oil (sometimes called hemp oil) and CBD oil aren’t the same thing. CBD comes from the flower while hemp seed oil comes from the seeds. The seeds contain fewer beneficial chemicals (cannabinoids and terpenes) than the flower and in much lower concentrations. However, they do contain some hemp phytochemicals that aren’t present in the flowers.

Using hemp seed oil as a carrier oil for CBD may contribute to what’s called the “entourage effect,” which basically means that combining parts of the plant may make each component more effective than it would be alone.

This quality makes hemp seed oil a popular choice for “full-spectrum” products, which contain all of the component chemicals of the hemp plant rather than just CBD.

Pros:

  • Rich in omega-3 fatty acids, which may lower inflammation
  • Ideal ratio of omega-3 to omega-6 fatty acids
  • High antioxidant levels
  • Good source of fiber
  • Contains magnesium, calcium, iron, and zinc
  • Possible entourage effect

Cons:

  • Lower solvency than MCT oil, meaning it can’t hold as much CBD
  • Higher priced than MCT oil
  • Flavor (sometimes described as “sharp” or “herby”) may clash with some palates
  • Side effects may include diarrhea, nausea, throat irritation, slow heart rate, high blood pressure

Buyer Beware

Some companies try to pass off hemp seed oil as CBD oil. Be sure to check the ingredients and amount of CBD a product contains before you buy it. All reputable companies should provide this information on their labels and websites.

Additional Health Claims

Hemp seed has been used medicinally for a wide array of conditions, most of which have not been researched enough to say for sure whether they’re safe and effective. The conditions include:

    , for its anti-inflammatory properties and blood pressure and other conditions involving skin inflammation

Olive Oil

Olive oil is probably the carrier oil you’re most familiar with. It’s certainly the best researched. It’s become one of the most commonly used cooking oils because of its many well-established health benefits:

Pros:

  • High in iron, vitamin K, vitamin E
  • Rich in antioxidants
  • Highly trusted
  • Absorbed by the skin even faster than MCT

Cons:

  • Its long-chain triglycerides are slower to absorb than MCT (but may absorb more efficiently)
  • Lower solvency than MCT, meaning it can’t hold as much CBD
  • Thicker than most other carrier oils, which may be unpleasant
  • Flavor is relatively strong and may be distasteful to some people

Additional Health Claims

Thanks to a significant amount of research, olive oil is known to:

  • Boost immunity
  • Reduce inflammation
  • Increase good cholesterol and lower bad cholesterol
  • Prevent blood platelet clumping, which can cause heart attacks
  • Aid in blood clotting
  • Improve gut-bacteria balance
  • Support proper nerve function
  • Prevent cognitive decline
  • Protect bones from thinning (osteoporosis)
See also  Cbd oil for njoy

Avocado Oil

Avocado oil has become more popular for a variety of uses, including cooking, as researchers have learned about its health benefits. As a CBD carrier oil, it’s used most often in topical products, but you can also find it in products that are meant to be ingested.

Pros:

  • Quickly and easily absorbed by your skin and digestive tract
  • Nutty flavor may be more pleasant than some alternatives
  • Especially good for topical uses
  • Rich in antioxidants
  • High in vitamins A, B, D, and E

Cons:

  • Much thicker than most carrier oils, which may be unpleasant
  • Significantly more expensive than many carrier oils
  • Higher allergy risk than many carrier oils

Additional Health Claims

Most of the research into avocado oil has been performed on animals, not people. Until researchers take this next step, preliminary evidence suggests that avocado oil may:

  • Lower bad cholesterol and raise good cholesterol, which decreases the risk of heart disease
  • Improve glucose tolerance and reduce insulin resistance, providing protection from diabetes
  • Improve metabolic markers

Avocado oil is less likely than many oils to clog your pores, so it’s popular for topical use. Plus, its slow drying time may help it last longer than some topical preparations.

Allergy Warning

Avocado allergies are possible. If you experience itching in your mouth after ingesting avocados or avocado oil, don’t ingest any more before talking with your healthcare provider about it. Some allergies tend to occur together. People with avocado allergies may be especially sensitive to:

  • Bananas
  • Watermelons
  • Cucumbers
  • Kiwis
  • Other fruits and vegetables
  • Latex

If you have an allergic reaction to any of these things, you should be tested for a reaction to the others as well.

Extreme Symptoms Are Possible

Extreme allergy symptoms, such as difficulty breathing or anaphylaxis, are uncommon (but possible) with avocados because digestive enzymes tend to break down the allergen before it’s absorbed into your body. Get emergency medical attention if you experience these symptoms.

Summary

Carrier oils are important to CBD because they help dissolve the cannabinoid’s molecules so they can be absorbed by the body. Many carrier oils are similar, but they may have differences that could be important to you for various health reasons. One key reason for using a carrier oil is that it improves bioavailability, which means it helps your body absorb CBD oil. Besides, to deliver accurate and consistent doses, it’s easier to measure out a dropperful of CBD-infused oil than a tiny amount of crystalline isolate (which is CBD in pure form). Carrier oils also may have health benefits all on their own. Four common carrier oils are medium-chain triglyceride (MCT) oil, hemp seed oil, olive oil, and avocado oil.

A Word From Verywell

Many people are quick to ask: “Which CBD carrier oil is the best?” Now you know that the answer depends on several factors, including the type and uses of the CBD product, whether you have allergies or certain health conditions, and your personal preferences. So look at it this way: If you try one oil and don’t like it, you can always try a different one. Meanwhile, be sure to ask your healthcare provider or pharmacist for advice along the way.

Cannabis for the Non-Stoner: 11 of the Best CBD Products to Try Right Now

I used to pop Aleve as if they were Tic Tacs. Three at a time, four at a time—whatever would get the job done. And if that meant taking 15 gel caps a day so be it. Liver be damned.

You see, I experienced my first “episode” at 31. I was standing over the sink one fall morning and sneezed. Hard. Before I knew it, my lower back gave way. Then a tremendous pain engulfed my body. And get this: The episodes recurred whenever they felt like it—peskier than a hungry mosquito. Twice a year if I was lucky, more if I wasn’t. (Once, in Paris, I actually had to purchase a cane. The only consolation to that otherwise crippling experience was that it felt comically chic: I was hobbling in The City of Light, clad in Hermès scarves.)

Aurora Elixirs is marketed as a mixer for cocktail creation. It is, however, a very good drink that . [+] can stand alone.

But during a trip to Las Vegas in 2017, I discovered CBD—the non-psychoactive cannabinoid found in Cannabis Sativa and hemp. I’d heard about it but I was skeptical. Could pain that had once rendered me dependent on a cane be helped by a single gumdrop? It sounded like one for the birds. I was never a big pot smoker growing up, nor have I ever been one to follow health fads. (I drink matcha because I like it—not because I think it will add years to my life.) But when I started reading more about CBD’s benefits it all made sense to me. The enthusiastic pro-CBD proclamations from friends didn’t hurt either. Plus, the prospect of natural pain relief was enormously appealing.

“CBD is extremely anti-inflammatory and neuroprotective. A normal person may use it to prevent conditions such as arthritis or even topically to prevent acne breakouts,” Dr. Shivani Amin, a physician and cannabis expert who is a member of the AMMPA (American Medical Marijuana Physicians Association), says. “I think CBD shows great promise for the future. It all boils down to educating the public about the correct usage and understanding the plant better.”

Plus Products make a variety of CBD, THC, and CBD:THC candies—all of which are packaged in nifty . [+] little tins that’ll fit anywhere.

But be wary of the products you buy and do your research. Some cannabis products work while many don’t, mainly due to lack of regulatory testing from the powers that be and quality control within companies, which is apparently common in the cannabis industry. Your best bet to avoid buying bogus products is to purchase your goods in states where cannabis is legal—because certain systems, standards, and protocols have already been put in place (such as seed-to-sale tracking).

So I went on a months-long mission to try various CBD edibles, tinctures, balms, and vapes. What I soon discovered was that cannabidiol is no lightning bolt cure. Think of it as taking maintenance meds: You have to consume it regularly—in a dose and delivery method that works for you—to notice the progressive increase of benefits. It also doesn’t leave you completely devoid of the misery of pain. Instead, CBD helps make pain infinitely more tolerable—downgrading it from ER-worthy agony to manageable discomfort.

And dosing is crucial.

“The most common symptoms I treat with CBD are inflammatory conditions and it is also often used for pain,” Dr. Amin says. “Dosing is patient dependent. I always start low and go slowly. I have found that 15mg of CBD is a good starting dose for most patients. You have to be careful after that and titrate each patient individually due to the chance of potentially increasing anxiety and depressive symptoms. I have found the most convenient way for most of my patients to consume CBD is through tincture form. But capsules and edibles are also great ways to consume CBD on a daily basis.”

San Francisco-based Pot d’Huile is beloved by pro-cannabis chefs and home cooks because of its . [+] uncompromising flavor. The company even hosts pop-up dinner collaborations with chefs.

Another thing I learned: CBD becomes more effective when taken in conjunction with a low dose of THC (tetradhydrocannabinol, the psychoactive component of cannabis). For those who worry about getting high, fear not. I was initially concerned about the possibility of diminished faculties. After all, many single-serving THC edibles start at 10mg—but it’s good to note that most people won’t need even half as much. So you can do as I do and cut THC chocolate squares or gummies as you see fit—and then “pair” them with a CBD edible or tincture. I’ve also started to microdose edibles that contain both CBD and THC. (I quarter or halve a Dixie Synergy Milk Chocolate 1:1 depending on how I feel.)

“Skepticism comes from lack of understanding. I have treated many patients with chronic conditions with full spectrum CBD and attained great results,” Dr. Amin says. “I also believe the public needs to understand that CBD works in conjunction with THC. Usually this requires at least 3–5% THC to work for serious forms of pain and more chronic medical conditions. I have patients come in with chronic and severe pain expecting to have their pain alleviated with just CBD. Although CBD works well for pain, in many situations patients with severe pain need to have some THC. [The cannabinoids ] work synergistically to help ease severe pain.”

Recess, a flavored sparkling water drink with hemp extract and adaptogens, has been popular among . [+] millennials. But the verdict is out on whether it’s effective or not.

These days I’m a believer. It’s difficult to ignore the fact that Epidiolex—the CBD-based epilepsy medication—was approved by the F.D.A last year. Or that athletes are abandoning NSAIDs (nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, such as ibuprofen or naproxen) for greener alternatives. Then there are Alfie Dingley and Billie Caldwell in the UK: Their cases involving rare forms of epilepsy have prompted UK home secretary Sajid Javid to say that specialists will soon be able to prescribe cannabis-based medication. Beyond that, nearly 7% of Americans are already using CBD—and given the population, that’s a staggering number.

Me? I haven’t taken an Aleve in more than a year. And no episodes either. Not after a particularly grim run or even a grueling Krav Maga session. Not even during a week-long fitness retreat. So here are a few of CBD favorites that have helped me deal with pain and soreness—plus a few THC–CBD combo products for those who are so inclined.

See also  Is plus cbd oil spray for arthritis

Kiva Confections’ Terra Bites come in two flavors: chocolate-covered coffee beans and . [+] chocolate-covered blueberries. It’s great when paired with a CBD-only edible.

I’m a sucker for packaging. And so I was immediately drawn to Lord Jones’ gumdrops, which are infused with broad spectrum CBD (not to be confused with full spectrum and isolate). It’s mighty convenient for frequent travelers like me who may want to take CBD while out and about: Just drop the (chichi) box in your purse—as opposed to worrying about leakage from a bottle of tincture. It also helps that they’re delicious—a little overly sweet but that’s hardly a crime. The downside? It’s pricey. Purchased online a nine-gumdrop box will set you back $45. In a shop like Clover Grocery in New York, it costs $50.

The New York Times may have called cannabis brand, Beboe, the Hermès of cannabis. But Lord Jones’ . [+] packaging is actually reminiscent of an Hermès box.

For home cooks like me, I recommend CBD extra virgin olive oil because of its versatility. You can drizzle it on everything from salads to pizza and even brambleberry ice cream. I even make a miso-honey glaze while using a little bit of the stuff. In particular, I’m a big fan of Pot d’Huile, which was founded by San Francisco-based Yannick Crespo. It’s stellar. For one thing, it tastes exactly the way good EVOO should—with none of that “green” marijuana aftertaste. It also doesn’t remind me of Bertolli—not that there’s anything wrong with it. But you know, delicious EVOO is nothing like Bertolli. Crespo attributes Pot d’Huile’s non-compromising flavor with the ethanol extraction process that the company uses, which is slightly more expensive—in addition to using locally-sourced oil from Northern California. The flavor is so good that Pot d’Huile regularly hosts pop-up dinners with chefs who are so into it. (And if you ever find yourself in a city where they’re hosting, it’d be a shame to skip out.) But beyond all that, Pot d’Huile makes dosing easy: It’s 1mg of CBD per 1ml of olive oil. So all you’ll really need to incorporate CBD EVOO into your meals are measuring spoons. And yes, they do have THC olive oils as well—at $50 for 100ml. In the future, the company also has plans on creating a THC–CBD oil. Easy peasy.

For chefs and home cooks, Pot d’Huile extra virgin olive oil is a pantry must-have.

If you’re the kind of person who eats, drinks, and cooks with honey, then this is the CBD product for you. Put it on ricotta toast with some figs. Make a salad dressing or sauce with it. Use it to sweeten your tea. Dump spoonfuls of it on your breakfast yogurt or oatmeal—then top the whole thing off with berries. Hell, you can even eat it right out of the jar. Anything goes, really. Just make sure you’re minding your dosage.

Got a sweet tooth? Into CBD? Then Potli’s CBD honey is what you’re looking for.

I’m ordinarily not a chocolate or sweets person. But when it comes to edibles, this delivery method works best for me when I’m traveling and away from my kitchen. Kiva’s products are what I carry whenever work (or pleasure) takes me on extended trips. The ginger dark chocolate and espresso dark chocolate are my favorites. They’ve got just enough THC and CBD to help ward off jet lag and fatigue. I also take them when I’m extra sore from running or Krav Maga. (It really does wonders for pain and inflammation.) But it’d be a disservice if I only mentioned Kiva’s chocolates. The company also offers Camino gummies, of which the sparkling pear and wild berry, are superb. The THC-only Terra Bites chocolate-covered blueberries are a gift from the gods—they work, they fit nicely in my purse, and they’re delicious. Also: a single dose (5mg) is low enough so that when paired with a CBD-only confection, such as Lord Jones’ gumdrops, there’s not really a high. You only get a pleasant mellowness that radiates throughout your body, which is almost akin to a mild boozy buzz—in a happy and good way. (In budtender lingo, it’s called a body high.)

Kiva Confections’ CBD:THC ginger dark chocolate is just the right amount of sweet. And no, you won’t . [+] taste the cannabis (which sometimes leaves a bitter green aftertaste) at all. The flavor is all chocolate.

I’m not big on CBD drinks. But I can appreciate that others are. And in the cannabis world, CBD and THC drinks abound: There’s CBD Living Water, Recess, Vybes, Lagunitas HiFi Hops, Somatik Cold Brew, Kikoko Tea, and more. But Aurora Elixirs is what I was drawn to. It’s marketed as a mixer for when you want to make cocktails. I, however, think it’s perfectly fine on its own. Pop it in the fridge to cool and drink it whenever you need it. No complicated recipe or garnish required.

Aurora Elixirs is one of many CBD drinks in the market. But this one is the most refreshing.

One major factor I considered when narrowing down this roundup is flavor. It comes in second to dosage—because nobody wants to consume anything that tastes remotely medicinal. Valhalla’s Tropical Twist is both tasty and dosed conveniently: Each gummy contains just enough THC and CBD to ease pain and promote recovery. And because it packs flat, it’s easy to stash and carry around. (I actually put a whole package in my laptop sleeve for accessibility when I’m on the go.)

If you’re not the kind of person who’s willing to “hack” CBD and THC edibles to pair with each . [+] other. Valhalla’s individual doses are ideal, ratio-wise.

This is what you’ll want (or need) if you’re looking for a “light” reprieve from discomfort. Or if you’re trying a THC:CBD edible for the first time—without any of the unpleasant side effects. Or if you’re taking CBD on a daily basis as maintenance. I guess what I’m trying to say is that Plus’ pineapple and coconut gummies will do you no harm. It’s a safe bet for beginners.

If you really want something that’s ultra-low dose, Plus Products’ pineapple and coconut gummies . [+] deliver less than 2mg of THC—just enough to work in conjunction with its 5mg of CBD.

If you really want something that’s ultra-low dose, these goji berries are the way to go. At 1mg THC and 2mg CBD per piece, there’s no going wrong. And it’s even more delicious than Plus Products’ pineapple and coconut gummies. Beware though: They’re beyond tasty so it’s very easy to forget that they actually contain cannabis. The organic goji berries are sourced from Tibet via Imlak’esh Organics and the chocolate complements them perfectly. I could eat three handfuls. But, of course, I won’t.

Trying a THC-CBD edible for the very first time? These goji berries are the way to go.

Cheeba Chews has a major fan base partially because of its potency and consistent dosage. (Even Andy Cohen enjoys them.) And for good reason. Each miniscule 1:1 chew contains 50mg of THC and 50mg of CBD. So consume it with caution. Here’s how: Place the taffy in the freezer for three to five minutes and cut it into tenths. That will give you a reasonable dose of approximately 5mg of THC and CBD per piece. Under no circumstance should you eat the whole chew—depending on your tolerance level, you may experience palpitations, anxiety, or a general sense of being mentally unwell. As an acquaintance put it, “You take too much and you feel like you’re losing your mind.” (Personally, I only have two teeny pieces and that’s on a bad day.) No relatively healthy person wants or needs 50mg of THC.

Cheeba Chews has a major fan base partially because of its potency and consistent dosage. And for . [+] good reason. Each miniscule 1:1 chew contains 50mg of THC and 50mg of CBD. So consume it with caution.

Mighty Health’s Balance formula is exactly what you need if you don’t care for chocolate, tinctures, olive oil, gummies, or vapes. Balance comes in capsule form. And while it contains a good dose of CBD, it’s not just a CBD pill. It’s a neutraceutical, which is technically not recognized as a separate category by the F.D.A—instead, neutraceuticals are pretty much treated like dietary supplements. This one in particular contains ashwagandha, L-Theanine, theobromine, and curcumin. I know, it sounds very Goop-y. But the most important thing is its per-capsule CBD content, which is a good dose at 10mg.

While Mighty Health’s Balance contains a good dose of CBD, it’s no ordinary a CBD capsule. It also . [+] contains ashwagandha, L-Theanine, theobromine, and curcumin.

Let’s say you’re in no mood for edibles, vapes, or capsules. Or none of the aforementioned delivery methods suit your lifestyle. Simply buy a full-spectrum CBD tincture such as the one Ojai Energetics offers. It’s unlike most tinctures, which are clear and oil based. This one is a deep moss green—extracted from whole plant—and water soluble. So you can put a dropper full into your coffee, chai, smoothie, or anything else really. And you can be sure you’ll be consuming all of it. (There won’t be any residue sticking to the sides of your glass—the way it is with many other oil-based drops.) Another plus is that it’s surprisingly sweet for something that looks like a bitter green juice made of 100% kale. I typically use two full droppers in my (home-brewed) chai and it’s helped tremendously with post-workout soreness.

Unlike most tinctures, which are clear and oil based. Ojai Energetics is a deep moss green—extracted . [+] from whole plant—and water soluble.