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Cbd oil benefits for social anxiety

Use of Cannabidiol for the Treatment of Anxiety: A Short Synthesis of Pre-Clinical and Clinical Evidence

1 Institute for Mental Health Policy Research, Centre for Addiction and Mental Health, Toronto, Canada.

2 Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada.

Patricia Di Ciano

1 Institute for Mental Health Policy Research, Centre for Addiction and Mental Health, Toronto, Canada.

2 Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada.

3 Campbell Family Mental Health Research Institute, Toronto, Canada.

Bruna Brands

1 Institute for Mental Health Policy Research, Centre for Addiction and Mental Health, Toronto, Canada.

2 Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada.

4 Controlled Substances and Cannabis Directorate, Health Canada, Ottawa, Canada.

1 Institute for Mental Health Policy Research, Centre for Addiction and Mental Health, Toronto, Canada.

* Address correspondence to: Patricia Di Ciano, PhD, Institute for Mental Health Policy Research, Centre for Addiction and Mental Health, 33 Russell Street, Toronto, M5S 2S1, Canada [email protected]

Abstract

Anxiety disorders have the highest lifetime prevalence of any mental illness worldwide, leading to high societal costs and economic burden. Current pharmacotherapies for anxiety disorders are associated with adverse effects and low efficacy. Cannabidiol (CBD) is a constituent of the Cannabis plant, which has potential therapeutic properties for various indications. After the recent legalization of cannabis, CBD has drawn increased attention as a potential treatment, as the majority of existing data suggest it is safe, well tolerated, has few adverse effects, and demonstrates no potential for abuse or dependence in humans. Pre-clinical research using animal models of innate fear and anxiety-like behaviors have found anxiolytic, antistress, anticompulsive, and panicolytic-like effects of CBD. Preliminary evidence from human trials using both healthy volunteers and individuals with social anxiety disorder, suggests that CBD may have anxiolytic effects. Although these findings are promising, future research is warranted to determine the efficacy of CBD in other anxiety disorders, establish appropriate doses, and determine its long-term efficacy. The majority of pre-clinical and clinical research has been conducted using males only. Among individuals with anxiety disorders, the prevalence rates, symptomology, and treatment response differ between males and females. Thus, future research should focus on this area due to the lack of research in females and the knowledge gap on sex and gender differences in the effectiveness of CBD as a potential treatment for anxiety.

Introduction

Anxiety disorders are the most prevalent mental illnesses in the world, leading to high societal costs and economic burden. 1 Anxiety is characterized by excessive anticipation of future threats and accompanied by excessive fear, which is an emotional response to imminent threats. 2 Persistent fear and anxiety lead to maladaptive behavioral disturbances and disability. Anxiety disorders are associated with panic attacks, avoidance behavior, and diminished sense of well-being, leading to troubled relationships, increased rates of unemployment, and elevated risk of suicide. 3 Neuropsychiatric anxiety disorders include generalized anxiety disorder (GAD), social anxiety disorder (SAD; also known as social phobia), specific phobia, panic disorder, and agoraphobia. 2 Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) are no longer classified as anxiety disorders in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders-5 2 ; however, they both encompass excessive anxiety and share common symptomology with anxiety disorders. 3 These disorders tend to be chronic and persistent, lasting 6 months or more, and have high comorbidity rates with other anxiety disorders and mental illnesses. 2,4

Currently, the main pharmacological treatments for anxiety disorders include selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors, monoamine oxidase inhibitors, tricyclics, partial 5-hydroxytryptamine 1A (5-HT1A) receptor agonists, and benzodiazepines. 5 These pharmacotherapies tend to have adverse effects and low efficacy (in only about 40–60% of patients), 4 with the majority of patients failing to achieve complete remission. 6 Anxiety disorders may additionally be treated using psychological approaches, including cognitive behavioral therapy, exposure therapy, and cognitive processing therapy, 4 although these therapies tend to be costly and limited to some therapeutic contexts. 7 Thus, there is a strong and urgent need to develop novel treatment approaches for anxiety disorders.

Cannabidiol (CBD) is a constituent of the Cannabis plant, which has potential therapeutic properties across many neuropsychiatric disorders. 8 Indeed, Epidiolex ® (99% CBD; 0.1% Δ-9-tetrahydrocannabinol [THC]) has been approved in some places for the treatment of epilepsy 9 and clinical trials have established that CBD can be an effective treatment for pediatric epilepsy, 10,11 or epilepsy with a pediatric onset. 12,13 Interest in the broader therapeutic potential of CBD is exemplified by the burgeoning number of systematic reviews and meta-analyses published within the past few years that champion its use in a number of potential therapeutic indications. CBD is well tolerated and effective in studies of social anxiety during public speaking tasks, 1,14,15 demonstrates promising data from early trials in psychosis to treat schizophrenia 16,17 and in the early studies of motor and nonmotor symptoms of Parkinson’s disease 18 ; it has also shown some promise in colitis. 19 Reviews of the pre-clinical literature have also shown some preliminary ability to ameliorate cancer tumors, alcohol use disorder, 20 pain, 21 as well as acting as an anti-inflammatory, analgesic, antiarthritic, anti-Alzheimers, antidepressant, antidiabetic, as well as others. 22

The primary psychoactive component of cannabis, THC, has its actions primarily at the cannabinoid type 1 (CB1) receptor. 23 By comparison, the pharmacological profile of CBD is very different from THC and it is currently not fully understood. 23 Nevertheless, it is known to have interactions with several receptors in both the central and peripheral nervous systems, 24 which are known to regulate fear and anxiety. These receptors include the serotonin 5-HT1A receptor, the CB1 and CB2 receptors, and the transient receptor potential, vanilloid type 1 receptor (TRPV1). 3,25 The acute anxiolytic effects of CBD at low and intermediate doses are thought to involve 5-HT1A activation. 8,26 Whereas TRPV1 antagonism allows for the anxiolytic effects of higher CBD doses, the anxiogenic effects of higher CBD doses involves TRPV1 agonism. 8,26 TRPV1 activity seems to be unique to CBD and a few other minor cannabinoids, as THC does not interact with this receptor channel. 27

Another potential mechanism through which CBD produces anxiolytic effects is due to the action of the endogenous cannabinoid anandamide in the brain. 28 CBD has been shown to increase cannabinoid receptor activation indirectly by elevating endocannabinoid levels through its action on endocannabinoid metabolism. 29,30 CBD has the ability to inhibit fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) enzyme, which metabolizes anandamide, consequently enhancing anandamide levels and indirectly increasing CB1 receptor activation. 29 CB1 receptor activation has been thought to mediate the ability of CBD to regulate long-term learned fear processing. 25 Endocannabinoid signaling is part of an endogenous anxiolytic neuromodulatory system, thus inhibition of FAAH activity is a potentially promising therapeutic approach for reducing anxiety-related symptoms. 30

After the recent decriminalization and legalization of medical and recreational cannabis in certain countries and jurisdictions, cannabis use continues to increase. 31–33 CBD has drawn increased attention as a potential treatment, as the majority of existing data suggest that it is safe, well tolerated, and has few adverse effects. 34 The World Health Organization stated that across a number of controlled open-label trials, CBD is generally well tolerated with a good safety profile. 35–37 Several studies propose that CBD is nontoxic, does not induce changes in food intake or catalepsy, does not affect physiological measures, and does not alter psychomotor or psychological functions. 37 In addition, chronic use and high doses of up to 1500 mg/day are reportedly well tolerated in humans. 37

Thus far, CBD demonstrates no potential for abuse or dependence in humans. 38 In one study, it was found that subjective ratings of “stoned” did not increase after administration of CBD to participants. 39 In other studies, CBD had no effects on visual analog scales of drug “high,” “good drug effects,” “street value,” 40 “liking,” “take again,” “bad effects” or alertness/drowsiness; CBD had slight effects on ratings of the positive effects of the drug. 41 THC alone or in combination with CBD increased ratings of “stoned,” 39 “high,” “good drug effect,” “liking,” “strength,” “good effect,” “desire to take again” 42 ; CBD thus had no effects on the subjective effects of THC. Although, it should be noted that in one study a high dose of vaporized CBD produced some intoxicating properties compared with placebo 43 ; therefore, CBD may have psychotropic properties in some preparations.

Pre-Clinical Studies

The anxiolytic effects of CBD were initially explored in pre-clinical studies, using several animal models and behavioral tests. The elevated plus-maze (EPM) was one of the first tests used in rodents to study the anxiolytic effects of CBD. Guimarães et al. 44 used the EPM to demonstrate a full dose–response curve in rats, after acute systemic administration of CBD, which produced a “bell-shaped” dose–response curve. These findings indicated that CBD is anxiolytic at low and intermediate doses and produces anxiogenic-like effects at higher doses. This has been further confirmed in other animal models of innate fear and anxiety-like behaviors using various behavioral tests, such as the EPM, open field, light–dark test, and predator exposure. 25 Furthermore, using the EPM, CBD displays anxiolytic effects similar to diazepam in both mice and rats. 44,45 Other behavioral tests used include the Vogal test, classical conditioning, marble burying test, chronic unpredictable stress test, fear and predator exposure tests, and the social interaction test, which have demonstrated different findings, including anxiolytic, antistress, anticompulsive, and panicolytic-like effects in rodents (for recent reviews, see Blessing et al., 3 Lee et al., 8 and Papagianni and Stevenson 25 ).

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To examine the mechanism of CBD-mediated anxiolytic-like effects in animals, microinjection models have been utilized. When CBD was injected into specific brain regions associated with anxiety, including the central nucleus of the amygdala, the dorsal periaqueductal gray, and the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis, anxiolytic effects were produced. 3 Antagonism of the 5-HT1A receptor resulted in attenuation of anxiolytic effects, thereby potentially mediated some symptoms of anxiety. 26 Overall, pre-clinical evidence strongly supports the anxiolytic role of CBD; however, the majority of pre-clinical research has only been conducted using male animals, therefore, these findings need to be replicated using females. 3,8

Clinical Studies

The anxiolytic effects of CBD observed in animals have provided insight and guided human research. The initial clinical studies examining the effects of CBD on anxiety were performed in the 1980s, when it was demonstrated that CBD could attenuate the anxiogenic and psychoactive effects of THC in healthy volunteers. 46,47 Since then, studies in healthy volunteers 14,46,48–50 and individuals with SAD 15,28 provide early evidence that CBD may have anxiolytic effects in humans. The Simulation Public Speaking Test has been used to examine the effects of CBD on anxiety in clinical studies. In both healthy volunteers and individuals diagnosed with SAD, it was found that in comparison with the placebo group, a 400 or 600 mg single dose of CBD significantly reduced subjective symptoms of anxiety and decreased cognitive impairment and speech performance discomfort. 15,28 Neuroimaging studies 28,48,49,51,52 of acute administration of CBD have demonstrated modified blood flow in specific brain structures associated with anxiety, including the amygdala, hypothalamus, hippocampus, and cingulate cortex. 53 In addition, retrospective studies have found CBD to be effective in reducing anxiety symptoms in patients with anxiety disorders and PTSD. These studies examined varying doses (e.g., 25–75 mg/day) and preparations (e.g., oral, sublingual spray) of CBD across different patient populations and in combination with other forms of pharmacological and psychotherapies, 54–56 although findings from such retrospective studies provide limited data due to small sample sizes and lack proper controls.

Three ongoing clinical trials are currently investigating the effects of CBD as a potential treatment for anxiety disorders. 57–59 Van der Flier et al. 57 are examining the effects of a weekly dose of 300 mg of CBD administered orally for 8 weeks, in individuals with phobic disorders. An ongoing phase 3 clinical trial is exploring the use of 200 mg ranging up to 800 mg of CBD administered in oil capsules, for the treatment of GAD, SAD, panic disorder, and agoraphobia. 58 Finally, an open label phase 2 clinical trial is currently examining the effects of a sublingual, 1.0 mg CBD tincture (10 mg/mL of CBD) three times a day for 4 weeks, in patients with an anxiety disorder diagnosis. 59 These studies are of great importance because the majority of studies assessing the effects of CBD on anxiety were conducted in healthy volunteers, and the clinical trials involving patients with SAD used small sample sizes, did not include placebo controls and did not establish a dose–response relationship between CBD plasma levels and anxiety symptom measurements. 60 In addition, future clinical trials are warranted to examine the effects of CBD on other anxiety disorders, including GAD, panic disorder, and phobic disorder, as well as anxiety-related conditions, such as PTSD and OCD.

Sex Differences in Anxiety and the Utility of CBD

The prevalence rates of anxiety disorders are approximately doubled in females compared with males and there are differing symptoms between sexes. 2,61,62 After puberty, females are more prone to anxiety disorders compared with males, largely due to the involvement of sex chromosomes and hormones. 63,64 Females typically demonstrate increased symptom severity, comorbidity, and burden of illness. 65 In terms of symptomology, females more frequently report somatic discomfort, demonstrate more internalizing coping styles, rumination, and have higher rates of comorbid mood disorders. 61,66 Males are more likely to report strained relationships as a result of excessive worry, have an increased fear of social consequences, and are more likely to have comorbid alcohol and substance abuse. 61,66 However, symptomology varies between different anxiety disorders, is influenced by social and environmental factors, and is dependent on puberty, menstrual cycle phase, pregnancy, and menopause in females. 61,67 Males and females may respond differently to psychotropic medication 67–69 ; thus, it is important to understand sex differences in anxiety disorders to better develop treatments for both males and females.

It has been demonstrated in animals and humans that THC has differential effects in males and females. 70 Sex differences have been observed in the pharmacokinetics, 71–74 pharmacodynamics, 75–78 subjective effects, 79–82 abuse liability, 83–86 and therapeutic potential of THC (for recent review see Cooper and Craft 70 ). Thus, other agents that target the endocannabinoid system, such as CBD, might be expected to have similar sex-dependent effects. The pharmacokinetics of CBD differ between males and females 71,87 ; however, there are nearly no sex comparisons of its effects, even in animals. 70 The majority of current pre-clinical studies have solely been conducted using male animals, 8 and to our knowledge no clinical studies have yet to explore sex and/or gender differences in CBD as a potential treatment for anxiety. Of the clinical studies that did include females, 14,15,46 no sex-specific analyses were performed. Therefore, due to the increasing prevalence of anxiety disorders and lack of effectiveness of current treatments, it is crucial to conduct research studies examining sex and gender differences in use of CBD as a potential treatment for anxiety disorders.

Conclusions

Overall, existing pre-clinical and clinical evidence supports a possible role for CBD as a novel treatment for anxiety disorders. The findings reviewed in this study demonstrate the potential of CBD to produce anxiolytic-like effects in pre-clinical models and the potential of CBD to induce acute anxiolytic effects when administered as a single dose in healthy volunteers and individuals with SAD. Although these findings are promising, future research is necessary to (1) determine the efficacy of CBD in other anxiety disorders aside from SAD in placebo-controlled clinical trials; (2) establish the most effective route of administration and appropriate dose of CBD to be utilized in treatment; and (3) determine the long-term safety and efficacy of CBD. There is a strong need to develop alternative and novel treatments for anxiety-related disorders, particularly focused on sex and gender differences, as prevalence rates, symptomology, and medication response differs between men and women. Owing to the lack of research in female animals and humans, and the knowledge gap on sex and gender differences in the effectiveness of CBD as a potential treatment for anxiety, future research should focus on this area.

How To Use CBD To Help Alleviate Anxiety

Dr. Bindiya Gandhi is an integrative medicine physician with expertise in functional and holistic medicine based in Atlanta, Georgia.

Commissions we earn from partner links on this page do not affect our opinions or evaluations. Our editorial content is based on thorough research and guidance from the Forbes Health Advisory Board.

Table of Contents

  • CBD for Anxiety
  • How to Use CBD for Anxiety
  • CBD Dosage for Anxiety
  • Potential Risks and Side Effects

While delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) can have a bad rap for being intoxicating and anxiety-inducing, cannabidiol (CBD) can actually be used to relieve anxiety. Research supports this benefit, with several studies reinforcing the positive effects CBD can have on various anxiety conditions. In fact, 51% of U.S. adults who use CBD do so to help alleviate their anxiety, according to a recent Forbes Health survey of 2,000 U.S. adults conducted by OnePoll.

CBD isn’t yet legally cleared as an anxiolytic, or anxiety relief medication. Therefore, it’s up to you—and, ideally, a doctor who specializes in cannabis administration—to determine whether CBD is a safe treatment for your anxiety.

Here’s what the science says regarding CBD’s anxiolytic properties, along with experts’ dosage guidelines and advice on how to take CBD safely.

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CBD for Anxiety

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has yet to approve any CBD-based medications for anxiety. However, many studies indicate the substance can be an effective anxiolytic.

CBD for Generalized Anxiety

In 2011, a small trial-tested CBD on participants with generalized social anxiety disorder (SAD) and healthy control patients undergoing a simulated public speaking test (SPST), which is a common anxiety testing method [1] Bergamaschi MM, Queiroz RH, Chagas MH, et al. Cannabidiol reduces the anxiety induced by simulated public speaking in treatment-naïve social phobia patients. Neuropsychopharmacology. 2011;36(6):1219-1226. . Compared to a placebo, CBD significantly reduced anxiety and discomfort in the participants with SAD. In fact, their reduced anxiety levels were comparable to those of the control participants.

Eight years later, a 2019 test compared the efficacy of three CBD doses (150 milligrams, 300 milligrams and 600 milligrams) and a placebo in men taking an SPST [2] Linares IM, Zuardi AW, Pereira LC, et al. Cannabidiol presents an inverted U-shaped dose-response curve in a simulated public speaking test. Revista brasileira de psiquiatria (Sao Paulo, Brazil : 1999). 2019;41(1):9-14. . Compared to a placebo, 300 milligrams of CBD significantly reduced participants’ anxiety during the speech, but the 150-milligram and 600-milligram doses did not. These results highlight how dosage can be highly variable and that more CBD isn’t necessarily more effective.

Meanwhile, another 2019 study tested CBD in much lower doses than most other clinical studies—some participants consumed 25 milligrams a day while others consumed 50 milligrams or 75 milligrams a day [3] Shannon S, Lewis N, Lee H, Hughes S. Cannabidiol in Anxiety and Sleep: A Large Case Series. Perm J. 2019;23:18-041. . Researchers thought higher doses might be too expensive for participants to maintain in their normal lives and that low doses would still prove effective. Indeed, anxiety decreased within the first month for most participants and remained low. Sleep quality also improved, although it fluctuated more than anxiety. Only three patients reported side effects.

CBD for Anxiety and Depression

In 2020, researchers tested the effects of CBD oil at varying doses across 397 patients with a variety of ailments [4] Gulbransen G, Xu W, Arroll B. Cannabidiol prescription in clinical practice: an audit on the first 400 patients in New Zealand. BJGP Open. 2020;4(1):bjgpopen20X101010. . Participants with non-cancer pain or mental health-related symptoms experienced significant improvement in anxiety and depression, as well as in their abilities to complete their usual activities. The use of CBD oil suggested significant pain relief in these groups as well.

CBD for PTSD and Phobia Therapy

A small 2019 study of 11 patients found that, when consumed orally and administered alongside routine psychiatric care, CBD decreased patients’ posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptom severity [5] Elms L, Shannon S, Hughes S, Lewis N. Cannabidiol in the Treatment of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder: A Case Series. J Altern Complement Med. 2019;25(4):392-397. .

Other studies suggest CBD can reduce PTSD symptoms when consumed with THC [6] Bitencourt RM, Takahashi RN. Cannabidiol as a Therapeutic Alternative for Post-traumatic Stress Disorder: From Bench Research to Confirmation in Human Trials. Front Neurosci. 2018;12:502. . When taken together, the two compounds create what’s known as the “entourage effect,” where THC enhances the effects of CBD as CBD tempers the effects of THC, resulting in a more well-rounded experience [7] Ferber SG, Namdar D, Hen-Shoval D, et al. The “Entourage Effect”. Terpenes Coupled with Cannabinoids for the Treatment of Mood Disorders and Anxiety Disorders. Curr Neuropharmacol. 2020;18(2):87-96. .

Some studies also suggest CBD can enhance the effects of exposure therapy—which assists patients in dissociating certain cues with a fear response—and cognitive behavioral therapy [8] Das RK, Kamboj SK, Ramadas M, et al. Cannabidiol enhances consolidation of explicit fear extinction in humans. Psychopharmacology (Berl). 2013;226(4):781-792. [9] Blessing EM, Steenkamp MM, Manzanares J, Marmar CR. Cannabidiol as a Potential Treatment for Anxiety Disorders. Neurotherapeutics. 2015;12(4):825-836. .

How to Use CBD for Anxiety

Without clear FDA guidance, optimal CBD use for anxiety varies from person to person. You may find one method works better for you over another. You can consume CBD in the following forms:

  • Oils and tinctures, which come in dropper bottles and are consumed by mouth
  • Gummies, which are chewable, sweet and often fruit-flavored
  • Sprays, which come in bottles with a nozzle to be sprayed in the mouth
  • Capsules, softgels or tablets, which are taken individually by mouth like a pill
  • Vapes, which heat CBD oil without igniting it, resulting in an inhalable vapor
  • Flowers, which are dried hemp plants that are typically ignited and smoked
  • Creams and gels, which introduce CBD topically (through the skin) as a more localized treatment

You may have to try different forms to determine what works best in addressing your anxiety. For instance, when it comes to the absorption of CBD in your bloodstream, vaping and smoking are more effective than edibles like gummies.

CBD Dosage for Anxiety

You also have to find the right CBD dosage for your anxiety. Experts suggest starting small and working your way up depending on how your body reacts.

Many clinical trials jump right to testing high doses. Successful doses evaluated for anxiety relief specifically include:

  • 600 milligrams in patients with SAD in a speech simulation [10] Bergamaschi MM, Queiroz RH, Chagas MH, et al. Cannabidiol reduces the anxiety induced by simulated public speaking in treatment-naïve social phobia patients. Neuropsychopharmacology. 2011;36(6):1219-1226.
  • 300 milligrams in male patients in a speech simulation [11] Linares IM, Zuardi AW, Pereira LC, et al. Cannabidiol presents an inverted U-shaped dose-response curve in a simulated public speaking test. Revista brasileira de psiquiatria (Sao Paulo, Brazil : 1999). 2019;41(1):9-14.

However, other trials suggest much lower doses are also quite effective in treating anxiety.

  • 25 to 75 milligrams for generalized anxiety and/or sleep problems [12] Shannon S, Lewis N, Lee H, Hughes S. Cannabidiol in Anxiety and Sleep: A Large Case Series. Perm J. 2019;23:18-041.
  • 33 to 49 milligrams a day for PTSD, in addition to routine psychiatric treatment [13] Elms L, Shannon S, Hughes S, Lewis N. Cannabidiol in the Treatment of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder: A Case Series. J Altern Complement Med. 2019;25(4):392-397.

Another study involving hundreds of patients noted success with doses from 40 milligrams to 300 milligrams a day, further supporting the idea that CBD dosage varies significantly, depending on a person’s symptoms and physiology.

Potential Risks and Side Effects

The World Health Organization deems CBD a safe and generally well-tolerated substance. Studies report very few adverse effects, if any.

However, taking CBD while on other medications may pose a risk, as these substances may interact and cause unwanted effects, such as weight gain, drowsiness, upset stomach and change in appetite.

Cheryl Bugailiskis, M.D., a cannabis specialist at Heally, a telehealth platform for alternative medicine, also warns people with preexisting liver injuries and people taking medications that can cause liver injuries should practice caution when using CBD.

Social Anxiety and the Benefits of CBD

Fifteen months after the pandemic brought the world, and its residents’ social lives, to their knees, the sun is shining, bars and restaurants are open again, and friends and family are making plans. For many people, this return to normalcy is one of joy and excitement. But for people with Social Anxiety Disorder (SAD), the sudden reappearance of social events, and even the anticipation of having to go back into the office, can bring about debilitating anxiety.

Social Anxiety Disorder is an intense fear of social situations in which a person fears being judged or humiliated around other people . The good news is, there are many treatments out there that can help with the symptoms. The most common methods are cognitive behavioral therapy and a type of medication known as SSRIs, but in recent years, alternative treatments have also come to light.

Enter CBD, also known as cannabidiol (say that five times fast), is an extractable ingredient found in the hemp/cannabis plant. Unlike its cannabis cousin THC, CBD doesn’t get you high. Its’ molecule makeup actually does quite the opposite, side-stepping the psychoactive effects of THC and instead promoting feelings of calm, clarity and focus. CBD supplements can come in the form of gummies , concentrated oil drops , bath bombs , capsules , and more.

So what does Social Anxiety look like?

According to Dr. James, MD , “[Anxiety] is something that every single person will experience in their lifetime as it is a natural response to stress. It can feel so prominent that it can be easy to let it take over and create distraction, so how well we cope with anxiety can greatly impact our overall well being.”

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Dr. James’s suggests a few tips to help alleviate the immediate symptoms of anxiety:

Meditate or practice breathing exercises

Write your anxious thoughts down on paper

Listen to your favorite music

Call a friend or family member to talk it out

Longer term, it may be beneficial to adapt some lifestyle changes that can help keep anxiety at bay. These include:

Creating a regular meditation practice

Eating well-balanced, healthy meals

Speaking to your doctor about medications

Implementing CBD into your daily life

Can CBD Help with Social Anxiety?

According to several scientific studies , CBD has been known to have many beneficial and calming effects on the human body and mind and can be used to counter some of the heightened emotions brought on by anxiety.

In several placebo-controlled studies across the world in which people with Social Anxiety Disorder took CBD supplements daily, almost every individual felt a positive change. (Whereas those who received placebos did not experience any changes.)

A 2019 double-blind study of 37 teenagers with Social Anxiety Disorder and avoidant personality disorder in Japan concluded that “ CBD significantly decreased anxiety measured by both scales. The results indicate that CBD could be a useful option to treat social anxiety.”

How much CBD should I take for Social Anxiety

How much CBD you should consume for social anxiety depends on a few factors: Body weight, personal tolerance, and product concentration.

Let’s break the factors down:

Body weight:

This is pretty intuitive, but a person who is on the smaller side will most likely require a lower dose of CBD than, say, The Rock. It is unlikely that a 120lb person and a 250lb person would both experience the same results from the same dose. (This is where talking to a professional comes in!)

Personal Tolerance:

If a person has been using cannabis products for a while, it’s likely they’ll need more CBD than someone who never uses CBD products. However, since consistent CBD use leads to long-term results, and more of them, there really is no one-size-fits-all answer. That’s why, with the help of a professional, you can tailor your CBD supplements to your personal needs.

Product Concentration:

Pay attention to the measurements listed on the CBD products you buy. If you have been taking 1ml of a CBD supplement that is 1000mg and you’re enjoying its effects, make sure when you need to buy more you don’t accidentally buy the same product at a weaker (or stronger) strength.For example our CBD oil drops come in a 30ml tincture in three strengths: 500mg, 1000mg, and 1500mg. Once you find the strength that works for you, stick to it. Concentration, in life and CBD, are key.

Conclusion:

Studies have shown that CBD can have positive effects on people with Social Anxiety Disorder. By creating uplifting feelings and a sense of calm, CBD can appease some of the symptoms social anxiety may cause. And just as a reminder, CBD is not like THC at all and will not get you high. So if you’re looking for ways to help with the symptoms of social anxiety, a CBD supplement might be a great option to add to your daily routine.

Pharmaceutically, these conditions are often treated by SSRI medications like Zoloft or Prozac which increase serotonin levels.

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Fifteen months after the pandemic brought the world, and its residents’ social lives, to their knees, the sun is shining, bars and restaurants are open again, and friends and family are making plans. For many people, this return to normalcy is one of joy and excitement. But for people with Social Anxiety Disorder (SAD), the sudden reappearance of social events, and even the anticipation of having to go back into the office, can bring about debilitating anxiety.

Social Anxiety Disorder is an intense fear of social situations in which a person fears being judged or humiliated around other people . The good news is, there are many treatments out there that can help with the symptoms. The most common methods are cognitive behavioral therapy and a type of medication known as SSRIs, but in recent years, alternative treatments have also come to light.

Enter CBD, also known as cannabidiol (say that five times fast), is an extractable ingredient found in the hemp/cannabis plant. Unlike its cannabis cousin THC, CBD doesn’t get you high. Its’ molecule makeup actually does quite the opposite, side-stepping the psychoactive effects of THC and instead promoting feelings of calm, clarity and focus. CBD supplements can come in the form of gummies , concentrated oil drops , bath bombs , capsules , and more.

So what does Social Anxiety look like?

According to Dr. James, MD , “[Anxiety] is something that every single person will experience in their lifetime as it is a natural response to stress. It can feel so prominent that it can be easy to let it take over and create distraction, so how well we cope with anxiety can greatly impact our overall well being.”

Dr. James’s suggests a few tips to help alleviate the immediate symptoms of anxiety:

Meditate or practice breathing exercises

Write your anxious thoughts down on paper

Listen to your favorite music

Call a friend or family member to talk it out

Longer term, it may be beneficial to adapt some lifestyle changes that can help keep anxiety at bay. These include:

Creating a regular meditation practice

Eating well-balanced, healthy meals

Speaking to your doctor about medications

Implementing CBD into your daily life

Can CBD Help with Social Anxiety?

According to several scientific studies , CBD has been known to have many beneficial and calming effects on the human body and mind and can be used to counter some of the heightened emotions brought on by anxiety.

In several placebo-controlled studies across the world in which people with Social Anxiety Disorder took CBD supplements daily, almost every individual felt a positive change. (Whereas those who received placebos did not experience any changes.)

A 2019 double-blind study of 37 teenagers with Social Anxiety Disorder and avoidant personality disorder in Japan concluded that “ CBD significantly decreased anxiety measured by both scales. The results indicate that CBD could be a useful option to treat social anxiety.”

How much CBD should I take for Social Anxiety

How much CBD you should consume for social anxiety depends on a few factors: Body weight, personal tolerance, and product concentration.

Let’s break the factors down:

Body weight:

This is pretty intuitive, but a person who is on the smaller side will most likely require a lower dose of CBD than, say, The Rock. It is unlikely that a 120lb person and a 250lb person would both experience the same results from the same dose. (This is where talking to a professional comes in!)

Personal Tolerance:

If a person has been using cannabis products for a while, it’s likely they’ll need more CBD than someone who never uses CBD products. However, since consistent CBD use leads to long-term results, and more of them, there really is no one-size-fits-all answer. That’s why, with the help of a professional, you can tailor your CBD supplements to your personal needs.

Product Concentration:

Pay attention to the measurements listed on the CBD products you buy. If you have been taking 1ml of a CBD supplement that is 1000mg and you’re enjoying its effects, make sure when you need to buy more you don’t accidentally buy the same product at a weaker (or stronger) strength.For example our CBD oil drops come in a 30ml tincture in three strengths: 500mg, 1000mg, and 1500mg. Once you find the strength that works for you, stick to it. Concentration, in life and CBD, are key.

Conclusion:

Studies have shown that CBD can have positive effects on people with Social Anxiety Disorder. By creating uplifting feelings and a sense of calm, CBD can appease some of the symptoms social anxiety may cause. And just as a reminder, CBD is not like THC at all and will not get you high. So if you’re looking for ways to help with the symptoms of social anxiety, a CBD supplement might be a great option to add to your daily routine.

Pharmaceutically, these conditions are often treated by SSRI medications like Zoloft or Prozac which increase serotonin levels.